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Home Authors A-E (By Surname) Agatha Christie – The A.B.C. Murders | Review
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Agatha Christie – The A.B.C. Murders | Review

Title: The A.B.C. Murders

Author: Agatha Christie

Type: Fiction

Page Count/Review Word Count: 252

Rating: 9/10

 

Agatha Christie - The A.B.C. Murders

Agatha Christie – The A.B.C. Murders

 

This is Christie at her best, published first in her glory period in the 1930s when she also released Murder on the Orient Express, Three Act Tragedy, Death on the Nile and And Then There Were None. I promise, you’ll enjoy this one – it’s up there with my favourites.

Picture the scene – Alice Ascher is killed in AndoverBetty Barnard dies in Bexhill, and Sir Carmichael Clarke is found dead in Churston. Hercule Poirot receives a letter in advance of each murder, telling him where to expect the crime to take place. The great detective must unravel the clues and try to stop the killer before further lives are claimed.

The inspector unravels the clues in his usual inimitable style, and it’s great fun to watch and learn as Hercule Poirot’s faultless logic helps to track the perpetrator down. This is a great book to start with if you’re new to Poirot or Christie, and seasoned readers are likely to have read it already.

Good luck solving why the killer always leaves a copy of the ABC railway guide beside his victims – that’s been one of my favourite riddles in any of the Agatha Christie books that I’ve read. As always, her mastery of the mystery genre is supreme, and you’ll be kicking yourself at the end when all is revealed. The sign of any good mystery book, encapsulated by Christie.

 

Agatha Christie

Agatha Christie

 

Click here to buy The A.B.C. Murders.

 

 
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